Weekly Recap 9/19/11 – Stories Relating to Social Media & the Law

Welcome to our weekly recap of stories relating to Social Media and the Law.  This was a busy week for Social Media – Kennesaw State University in GA, hosted its annual Social Media Integration Conference – and so much more like insider trading.  What are your thoughts on using social media to save a convicted criminal from execution or how would you change the Children’s Online Privacy Protection rule?

These are some of the articles, reports, posts, etc. that caught our attention this week.  We originally send them out through our twitter account @law2smdeborah, so follow us to get them as we find them.  But many of them are such great resources we don’t want you to miss them, so we’ve decided to put them as a weekly recap.  The links will take you to their original sources, whether Mashable, Lexology, and/or others.  Enjoy and let us know some of the stories you’ve found interesting this week.  Just share in the comments below.  Have a great week!

 

SMIATL Recap (September 17, 2011)

Kennesaw State University’s Center for Sustainable Journalism (http://sustainablejournalism.org/) hosted its annual Social Media Integration Conference (http://smiatl.com/) this past weekend, September 16-17, 2011.  Law2sm founder Deborah Gonzalez, joined over 100 participants in a series of panels, workshops, keynotes and presentations.  Members of Atlanta Social Media Women (http://www.atlantasocialmediawomen.com/) were prominent as presenters and facilitators throughout the event.  Kudos to Barbara, Jacqui, Tobey; Kellye and others!

Three take-a-ways to share with all of you:

  • 7 Business Drivers of Social Media Marketing, by Jason Falls, founder of Social Media Explorer Blog (http://www.socialmediaexplorer.com/) and co-author of No Bullshit Social Media (www.nobullshitsocialmedia.com).  His drivers include:
    • Enhance branding and awareness
    • Protect Your Reputation
    • Enhance Public Relations
    • Build Community
    • Enhance Customer Service
    • Facilitate R&D (Research & Development)
    • Drive Sales
  • How to Reach the Media with Social Media by Jeff Cutler (http://jeffcutler.com/),a social media journalist.  Jeff discussed important points such as:
    • The difference between citizens reporters and journalists
    • Help journalists out by giving them stories that are timely and will engage their audiences – so get to know the journalism (what they write about, where they publish, etc.)
    • The important of “derivative” stories to help you stand out.
    • Some key web sites to bookmark for engaging with journalists:

Deborah Gonzalez, @law2smdeborah, ended her day at SMIATL by joining a group of highly experienced professionals for a guided discussion on the unique challenges that face expert level executives and consultants in the social media arena.  This session was facilitated by Kellye Crane of Solo PR Pro (http://soloprpro.com/).  The other discussants included Jeff Cutler, social media journalist, @JeffCutler; Eunice Nyandat, The Errand Managers (http://www.errandmanager.com/); and Marissa Stone, social media and technology specialist, @Marissa_Stone.  Three core challenges came up during the conversation:

  • How do we keep clients in compliance with social media in heavily regulated industries such as medical, pharmaceuticals, insurance, legal, etc.?
    • Work with a professional who knows the ins and outs of compliance and regulations (like Law2sm).
  • Do we need certification for social media professionals?  Who would certify and what would they certify?
    • There is a lot of debate, especially over who should be doing the certification and what will it mean.
  • What are the most effective tools and techniques for listening to a population you are not allowed to connect with directly?
    • Sometimes the backdoor or good old fashioned “bumping” into someone and speaking to them outside of the social media/online environment is the way to go.

There is so much more in terms of these three.  What are your thoughts?  Did you attend SMIATL or a similar conference?  What key take-a-ways can you share with all of us?

 

NGBC: Social Media Workshop (September 12, 2011)

The North Georgia Business Connection (http://www.gongbc.com/) along with Reformations Productions (http://www.reformationproductions.com/) held a Social Media Workshop event on Monday, September 12, 2011 at Dave & Busters in Duluth, GA (http://www.daveandbusters.com/).  Law2sm’s founder, Deborah Gonzalez, was there presenting on Five Social Media Legal Myths every business person should know (http://law2sm.com/category/legal-myths/).

Deborah’s presentation laid out some key points regarding legal issues and social media including:

  • Make sure you have the right person with the right skills for the job – whether that is a social media management company or a social media lawyer;
  • Make sure to have a plan – what is your goal for using social media?  Is your use of social media in compliance with legal regulations or with industry standards and norms?
  • Make sure to invest the resources to protect your brand and your company’s reputation, online and off, through the use of trademarks, best practices , employee policies, and more.

Business professionals have a lot on their plates and they often wear more than just one hat (especially small business owners).  If you are going to use social media, get the right folks in place to help you, especially in the beginning.  It’s worth the investment.

Contact Law2sm now for a “Talk it Out Legal Chat Session”.  Only $225 for 60 minutes to go over your concerns about protecting your company’s brand and digital assets. We’ll go over your questions and look at recommended next steps to help you reach your goals legally and professionally.  Or request a Social Media Legal Audit (http://law2sm.com/services/) – this comprehensive assessment reviews your current policies and social media presence to identify legal loopholes or gaps and what you can do to protect your business online.  Pricing is based on size and revenue of company.  Call now for more information 404-857-1331!

Rachel Bennet of Reformation Productions, Deborah Gonzalez of Law2sm, and Rob Donahue of NGBC.

Weekly Recap 9/12/11 – Stories Relating to Social Media & the Law

Welcome to our weekly recap of stories relating to Social Media and the Law.  We have passed the 10-year mark on 9-11.  So much has changed since that fateful day – people wondered what would have happened then if we had the social media platforms that we have now.  Could we have stopped it?  Saved more?  What can social media do for us now, to protect us and keep us safe?  Is a little government monitoring through social media a small price to pay for safety?  What do you think?

These are some of the articles, reports, posts, etc. that caught our attention this week.  We originally send them out through our twitter account @law2smdeborah, so follow us to get them as we find them.  But many of them are such great resources we don’t want you to miss them, so we’ve decided to put them as a weekly recap.  The links will take you to their original sources, whether Mashable, Lexology, and/or others.  Enjoy and let us know some of the stories you’ve found interesting this week.  Just share in the comments below.  Have a great week!

Tweetup at the High Museum of Art, ATL

On Thursday, September 1, 2011, Law2sm’s founder, Deborah Gonzalez, participated in a fun-tweetiful event – the High Museum of Art, in Atlanta, GA, hosted a TweetUp. Twitter users were invited to tour the museum for free and share their thoughts about the museum’s exhibits with their followers.

As tweeters “tweeted’ their experience to their followers, their tweets were displayed on a full-length screen in the Museum’s lobby.  Tweeters shared thoughts, photos, and information about the various pieces of art and artifacts throughout the museum complex.  The evening was full of surprises as “Andy Warhol” was on hand to greet the tweeters and promote the upcoming Picasso and Warhol exhibit and certain tweeters won prizes such as museum t-shirts, free admission tickets to return to the museum and other High swag.

Organizers of the event did a lot of things right – they were prepared – including their admissions stickers that participants wore that had the twitter bird and the twitter hashtag for the event #hightweetup prominently displayed.  No one could forget the hashtag and its neon colors had other museum visitors inquiring about what did it mean?

However, as this is a legal blog relating to social media I wanted to focus on another thing the museum organizers did right – as each participant signed in (registration was requested online prior to the event) – they received a printed document entitled “Tweetup Gallery Photo Policies” from the hostesses.  Smartphones and iPads abounded at the Tweetup.  Tweeting pics was to be a big part of the Tweetup, but the museum did have some concerns.

This half sized piece of paper laid out the guidelines relating to photographing inside the museum.  The museum reminded the tweetup participants that it is “bound to certain contracts and restrictions that may not allow for every work of art to be photographed.”  Intellectual property rights, publicity rights, and other legal rights all play a part in protecting and conserving the value of art for today and many generations to come.  Lending works of art between museums is a common occurrence but is based on trust and contractual agreements of what is to be permitted with the art work, how it is to be exhibited, for how long, etc.  Reciprocity is important, and if one museum fails to adhere to the contract, other museums will find out and then not want to lend them their art in the future for security concerns.

The Tweetup Photo Policies laid out in clear, simple English, what exhibits could be photographed during the event, but more importantly, what exhibits could not.  Most museums have a “No Photography” rule – if you like an exhibit more likely than not there is a postcard or catalogue book with the image in it, ready for you to purchase.  If photography is allowed it is usually limited to permanent collections and for private use and viewing – not for commercial activities – so you can’t take a photo, enlarge it to poster size and sell it on your eBay® account.  That’s a big no-no.

The policies also gave participants a contact or contacts – who to ask if you weren’t sure if you could take the photo or not – security officers!  Talk to them, they are not so scary and actually know something about the exhibits – at least the ones we spoke to.  They also had a few funny stories to share about the big silver-plated platter by Anish Kapoor on the third floor.  Born in India in 1954, Anish’s sculptures are meant to be interactive and they invite the viewer to do more than just look.  The platter stands against a wall.  If you stand in front of it, and someone stands on the other side of the room behind you, you can whisper and they would hear what you said.  It is quite eerie but a lot of fun and you need at least two to make it work – it’s invitation to engage make it a great symbol for the tweetup – art to be experienced, to be shared, to be social.

We look forward to the next one.  Stay tuned!

http://www.high.org/

Deborah Gonzalez, founder of Law2sm, tweeting at the High Tweetup; Background image is Leda and the Sawn by Vik Muniz, 2009

 

DG in front of Anish Kappoor's silver resounding platter, 3rd Floor.